Who We Are Hero

Working together, we are One for Water™

Our Members

AMWUA’s membership is limited to ten large municipalities in Maricopa County, Arizona. Collectively, the AMWUA members serve nearly 3.5 million people—more than 50 percent of the state’s population.

Map
Peoria
Peoria

Peoria

Website

The city of Peoria incorporated in 1954 and initiated water service that same year. Today, the city stretches across 178 square miles, reaching north of Lake Pleasant, and serves 171,700 residents. The city’s infrastructure comprises two water treatment plants, three wastewater treatment plants, 1,179 miles of water lines, 789 miles of wastewater lines, 27,246 water valves, 10,093 fire hydrants, and 59,105 water meters.

Phoenix
Phoenix

Phoenix

Website

Phoenix Water is one of the largest utilities in the country, delivering water to 1.6 million residents and handling wastewater treatment operations for 2.5 million residents in five cities. Phoenix’s vast infrastructure includes 7,000 miles of water lines, 5,000 miles of sewer lines, eight treatment plants, dozens of pump stations, reservoirs and wells, 50,000 fire hydrants, and more than 420,000 water meters over a 540 square-mile service area. Phoenix is one of AMWUA’s three founding members.

Scottsdale
Scottsdale

Scottsdale

Website

Scottsdale Water with a population of almost 250,000 delivers an average of 61 million gallons of water a day to more than 91,000 customers through more than 2,000 miles of pipes and maintains more than 10,000 fire hydrants. Its wastewater system comprises 1,400 miles of lines and more than 40 lift stations. It is the first Arizona water utility to implement indirect potable reuse. Scottsdale is one of AMWUA’s three founding members.

Glendale
Glendale

Glendale

Website

The city of Glendale has been providing water to its residents for more than a century. It is now the state’s fifth largest city, spanning nearly 56 square miles with a population of about 246,000. It maintains and operates four water treatment plants, two wastewater treatment plants, 1,040 miles of water lines, 703 miles of wastewater lines, 8,400 fire hydrants, and 62,600 water meters. Glendale was the first city in the country to adopt an ordinance requiring water efficient fixtures.

Avondale
Avondale

Avondale

Website

In the 1860’s, the community that became Avondale was known as “Coldwater,” named for the Agua Fria River and springs. Avondale now stretches across 41 square miles and is home to more than 80,000 residents. The city maintains 328 miles of water lines, 326 miles of wastewater lines, 2,721 fire hydrants, 23,499 water meters and operates 3 water treatment plants and 1 wastewater treatment plant.

Goodyear
Goodyear

Goodyear

Website

Goodyear is growing into its 191 square miles of space on the west side of the Valley. With a population of 78,000 residents, Goodyear's infrastructure is currently comprised of four water treatment plants, three wastewater treatment plants, 327 miles of water lines, 254 miles of wastewater lines, 3,228 fire hydrants, and 18,994 water meters.

Tempe
Tempe

Tempe

Website

Tempe was settled as Hayden’s Ferry along the banks of the Salt River in the 1860’s. It is AMWUA’s most compact member, serving 176,500 residents within 39.5 square miles. When Arizona State University is in session, the city grows by 80,000 students. Tempe’s infrastructure includes 2 water treatment plants, 846 miles of water lines, 579 miles of wastewater lines, 8,982 fire hydrants, 43,231 meters, and 1 wastewater treatment plant.

Mesa
Mesa

Mesa

Website

Mesa, the third largest city in the state, has been delivering water for more than a century. The city maintains and operates two water treatment plant, three wastewater treatment plants, 2,450 miles of water lines, 1,750 miles of wastewater lines, 20.248 fire hydrants, and 149,410 water meters across 138 square miles, providing service to 501,137 residents. Mesa is one of AMWUA’s three founding members and the founder of the Water—Use It Wisely campaign.

Gilbert
Gilbert

Gilbert

Website

Gilbert is home to nearly 247,000 residents across 72 square miles. The town’s infrastructure includes two water treatment plants, two wastewater treatment plants, 1,333 miles of water lines, 990 miles of wastewater lines, 83,055 water meters, and 12,578 fire hydrants. 70 miles of reclaimed water pipes deliver water to 60 customers for irrigation of parks and common areas, offsetting the use of drinking water. The remaining reclaimed water is used to replenish underground water supplies.

Chandler
Chandler

Chandler

Website

More than 260,000 people reside in Chandler. The city supplies an average of 58 million gallons of drinking water each day to customers across 64 square miles through two water treatment plants and 1,230 miles of potable water lines. The city maintains 15,096 fire hydrants, nearly 84,000 meters, 1.015 miles of wastewater lines and operates three wastewater treatment plants. The city delivers more than 9.4 billion gallons of recycled water for irrigation, groundwater recharge, and wildlife habitat through 94 mies of reclaimed water lines.

AMWUA Vision

AMWUA will be a successful advocate and leader on water issues, ensuring that its members’ water supplies are protected and enhanced, and that laws and regulations support economic prosperity and water resources sustainability. AMWUA will be a recognized and respected expert on water issues, serving as a valuable resource to its members, water professionals, policy-makers, educators and the general public.

AMWUA Mission

AMWUA protects our members’ ability to provide assured, safe, and sustainable water supplies to their communities. Working collaboratively, we advocate responsible water stewardship that supports economic prosperity and safeguards Arizona’s water supplies for future generations.

AMWUA Values

We believe in leadership, initiative, and taking bold action. In serving with commitment, determination, and persistence. In performing with integrity, accountability, and reliability. In developing and advocating effective solutions through collaboration and consensus: discussion debate, and diverse stakeholder input; communication and education.

The AMWUA Story

~Our Milestones Over the Years~

Our People

AMWUA provides a forum for its members to share information and evaluate water issues of importance to them and to reach consensus on issues through discussion and debate. Proposed positions and policies are usually developed through a committee process involving the Technical Advisory Groups, the Management Board, and the Board of Directors.

The people who come together around AMWUA’s boardroom table are dedicated to ensuring reliable, sustainable water supplies for generations to come.

AMWUA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

AMWUA is a nonprofit corporation governed by a Board of Directors comprising mayors and council members representing its ten member municipalities.

MANAGEMENT BOARD & TECH ADVISORY GROUPS

The AMWUA Management Board and Technical Advisory Groups (TAGs) provide critical input and guidance to the Executive Director and Board of Directors.

AMWUA STAFF

The AMWUA staff is a hardworking team of professionals dedicated to supporting the members in pursuit of the Association’s vision.

Water is essential for life. It supplies food, generates energy, and creates jobs. The wellbeing of our communities and economies depends on it. In a desert, we are acutely aware that we must continue to plan, invest, and develop forward-thinking policy today to ensure safe, reliable, and sustainable water supplies for the future.